Orkney Standing Stones in Winter Snow

Contrary to many expectations, snow is rare here in the Orkney Islands of northern Scotland. The surrounding waters are too mild and salty, the rainfall is just not that frequent either. So when it snows we take photos – and then everyone gets the wrong impressions. So, here are some pictures of Orkney, taken in February 2009, looking quite unlike how most visitors to these World Heritage sites remember.

Sunrise at Ottersgill:

sunrise Orkney Islands Feb 10th 2009, 8am

sunrise Orkney Islands Feb 10th 2009, 8am

My photo project was to record the snow at major landmarks, such as the Ring of Brodgar stone circle and the Stenness Standing Stones – both Neolithic structures (Stone Age). The second batch of photos will be of some of Orkney’s trees, the branches of which show up well against the white landscape.

Stenness Standing Stones:

5,000 year old Stenness Standing Stones, Orkney

5,000 year old Stenness Standing Stones, Orkney

Ring of Brodgar and Comet Stone:

Comet Stone and Ring of Brodgar

Comet Stone and Ring of Brodgar

Ring of Brodgar and surrounding ditch:

The rock-cut ditch around the Ring of Brodgar, now mostly infilled

The rock-cut ditch around the Ring of Brodgar, now mostly infilled

Lichen growing on one of the stones:

Lichen growing on the stones at Ring of Brodgar, Orkney

Lichen growing on the stones at Ring of Brodgar, Orkney

Note: I took these pictures when the temperature was about freezing, the air damp, and I just wore a t-shirt and fleece, with a woolly hat, no gloves. For the pictures around our house I was barefoot. Like I say, you have to play to survive!

More of Orkney pictures and places to visit.

Orkney trees in winter

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5 responses to “Orkney Standing Stones in Winter Snow

  1. Rainfall is just not that frequent??

  2. Pingback: Orkney Trees in Winter « Play2survive’s Weblog

  3. My husband and I are planning a trip to orkney next April. We live in South Africa and have family links to the islands. Do you know of anyone who specialises in genealogies in the area? Loved your photos of the trees and the standing stones.

  4. I’ve had some experience in having to survive myself, over the years. Your course seems to be exactly the sort of thing I’d be interested in. It’s heartening to discover someone has finally decided to try this initiative in Orkney.

  5. Pingback: Orkney trees in winter

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